Autumn’s Sweet Breath

 Sitting in the sweet morning’s early light, in my own backyard in SW Ohio,  I’m conscious of how Autumn is chasing away Summer’s close breath, like the coolness of a breath-mint, clean, fresh and mentholated.

But the grass is still deep emerald green, having had enough rain to make Ohio stand proud and pretty in its party dress.

The cornfields offer their own kind of show– red=headed tassels as the sun lights them from above. The stalks vary in colors, from green to yellow and russet brown–determined by what?  When they were planted?  The elevation and drainage? It’s a question that my 8 year old grandson, Ty, might ask.

The black-eyed Susan’s have run out of colorful petals and remain as dark seed pods, easy-access to the birds.

The cone-flower, Echinacea,  has lost its flirty color–a come-hither to the butterflies– offering a harvest of wellness tea for the changing of the seasons—bittersweet and blessed.

Traveling the world has offered me a perspective about my own hometown to which I’d been blind:  the beauty of a pasture; the sparkle of a lake;  the smell of fresh-mown hay–triggering childhood memories of times when I would lie on the warm summer earth, trying to make images of the clouds, punctuated by occasional  jet streams  criss-crossing the soft blue sky, adding a distant hum to the crickets’ and cicadas’ cadence as I spun my dreams.

Soon I will be on the road again–traveling in awe and wonder, hopefully meeting a new friend or few.  It’s nice to appreciate what I am–and love  because of whence I came.

All the best,

Gini

The Good Natured Traveler

 

 

 

 

New Year’s Re-SOUL-U-tion

New Year’s Re-SOUL-ution

Personal Activisim

Can you feel the heightened energy as we head into 2017?  There are changes afoot–it’s in the air.

Politically, we have drawn lines in the sand.  Often, time makes fools of us,  Do you remember the difference between reaction and response?

Response is the root word of responsibility, after all.

Reaction sounds like an action that has been taken before.

I don’t want to walk down any time-worn, dead-end alleys–do you?

I am going to welcome change into my life on a personal level and use my energy to reach the people who come into my life.

It’s exponential–we reach–they reach–soon, it can be the hug that was felt around the world.

Morphing from Optimistic to Optimystic

Learning to be Optimistic

One of the lessons my Mother taught me was to couple a bad experience with a fun-filled one.

Having polio put that to test more than once.

I can remember going to get fitted for braces at a machine shop attached to Children’s Hospital.  I had a lump in my throat all the way there because I hated it so much.  There was a metallic, smell of oil and a man with a big dirty leather apron who would stepkindly from behind the counter to fit me.  He was gentle and that made it even harder to choke back the tears—I didn’t want to wear those big, clunky, heavy shoes with those heavy, cold steel rods that kept me upright.   I had to admit that something was  different about me on those days. It felt all wrong.   i tried not to complain because I knew even then that it hurt my mother to see me cry.

And then…  she would gather me into the car and say, “Ok, Let’s go to our favorite restaurant,” —Sugar ’N Spice!:, then we would go to a Cinerama movie to see something amazing like—The Wonderful World of the Brothers’ Grimm or Paint Your Wagon or Dr. Zchivago—and then, we’d go shopping!

 I guess I got my shopping propensity from that!

Morphing from Optimistic to Optimystic

I began learning to be “optimystic” as I saw coincidences and synchronicities around me too often to believe them to be “just pure luck”.  That makes even less sense than thinking there must be some sort of cause and effect afoot.

And I’ve learned to trust “timing”, even dabbling in manipulation by learning to SLOW DOWN TIME.

For instance, when I realize that I have more to do than time to do it in, as often happens, I say out-loud:  SLOW DOWN TIME  and I imagine all that I want to accomplish.  Then I let go of the worry. I don’t check the clock anymore after that–until I’m done.   I just get going, doing one thing (or more) at a time and not engaging in panic nor doubt that it’s going to get done.

And Voila`–it works!   Saving me from stress. Granny in black hat