Copenhagen

It’s old. It’s new. It’s fascinating.

People are tall! Bikes everywhere, no traffic jams in sight.

It feels clean and efficient with wind-mills turning in greeting to the airplanes gliding towards Copenhagen.

English is spoken flawlessly. Their manner is breezy and matter-of-fact, soothing to my straight-talking Virgo soul. It feels organizationally sound somehow.

I found the metro easy to use and the food was tasty–coriander is the spice that we brought home. (We like to look for signature flavors from each country or area that we visit.) Did you know that coriander comes from Cilantro? Coriander is the plant and cilantro refers to the stems and leaves. When we use coriander, we are using the plant’s seeds.

We were told that we must see Christiania–so I sought it out, hopping the metro to Christianshavn St, I asked until I found Pusher Street. Everyone knows. Christiania is an evolved community stemming from counterculture values expressed in the 70’s when squatters took over government buildings that had been abandoned. It is an indication of the liberal attitudes of the country and is tolerated if not accepted. It has its own flag, schools, cafe`s, shopping kiosks and eateries. There is a “no-tell” feeling of keeping Christiania discreet. I felt like I must be flashing back to Haight-Ashbury in the 60’s.

Definitely take a boat tour of the canals–it’s an amazing view offering the feel of transportation old-style, more convenient than winding through streets and traffic.

And the icing on my Danish (pardon my metaphor) was the Street Food Court! What a hoot. People gathered around a fire pit on the dock, watching water traffic and birds sailing in and out. Beer stations are sprinkled throughout and kiosks of food crowd a warehouse of hungry patrons. If you aren’t hungry when you get there, the smells of delicious offerings will rapidly whet your appetite for more.

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